Hand Quilt Along ~ December 2018

I have taken to bed to work on my quilt this month. The shortest of days, and the not so cold (thankfully) days have been perfect for binge watching this and that propped up with Wishing You Good Will on my lap.

63

I can feel the progress being made and I am anxious to get this part of the quilting process done.

64.jpg

The thought of working on her scalloped edging does have me a bit nervous as I have never worked anything but a straight edge. But deep breaths, I can do this. I used a  king size sheet for my backing but with this quilt top so massive there was one side that overlapped. I took the plunge and actually cut away part of the top – my original plan. It hurt but it was just half a loop and it turned out fine.

65

What a wonderful way to ring in the new year with Wishing You Good Will and happy healthy projects started and finished in the coming New Year!

““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““`

This Hand Quilt Along is an opportunity for hand quilters and piecers to share and motivate one another. We post every three weeks, to show our progress and encourage one another.  If you have a hand quilting project and would like to join our group contact Kathy at the link below.

KathyLoriMargaretKerryEmmaTracyDebConnieSusan,  NanetteSassy , EdithSharonKarrin, and Gretchen

Advertisements

December T Block – Quilt Along

It is time for the reveal of the second block in the T Block Quilt Along that I am participating in. This a block a month project organized and led by Bella of Then and Again Quilts

For twelve months I am receiving a pattern for a variation of the T bock – the T for Temperance Movement, with much written and debated about this quilt origin’s and history. Please take some time and stop by Bella’s page she has written quite a bit on its history.

So how do I think I am doing with this project? I love the block a month, no pressure and I am actually completing two. Two because the first isn’t quite right and well, I think I could go three or even four and still wouldn’t have it spot on right. Here is my second attempt. (not bad)

Tblock5

 

First and second attempts and you can see the difference. (The color is true in this first attempt photo)

I wanted to share the block that was done by Bella – it is so gorgeous.

TblockBella

I was really excited to see this on her posting. I have a baby quilt I want to make for my granddaughter & husband who are expecting their first child – its a boy. I was going to use the pinwheel pattern but if I can get those darn geese down I think this would make a great children’s quilt. Bella called this her wonky blocks for this pattern. What do you think, pinwheel or T block ?

TblockBella2

 

The Wealth OF These Beauties

Yesterday was a busy day – the most exciting part being that I was able to pick up the framed quilt blocks that I had rescued about a month ago.  I wrote a post ‘A Neighbor Told A Neighbor’ which told of me being gifted a worn and torn quilt that was going to be thrown out. My neighbor Velma and her son Dan believed the quilt had been done by Velma’s mother, Gertrude Ernesteen Todd. I was able to save only 2 panels from the quilt and decided to have them framed.

Here they are ~

60.jpg

I was so excited to finally have them home and for gift giving ~

Over at Velma’s (84) and her son Dan’s home, joined by the ‘neighbor who told the neighbor’ ~ Poodle Nancy (she show’s Poodles and you may have seen her in the ring at sometime if you watch the televised dog show’s)

I revealed the 2 beauties ~

I gave one of them as a gift and asked to keep the other. Can you guess which one Velma choose?

This gorgeous one in the reddish frame

58.jpg

And I got the gorgeous peach tulip in the brown tones

59.jpg

It was so hard to get a picture with out glare and as you can see out doors captured the reflection of winters bare branch trees

Spending some time with Velma and Dan, it became clear they were not sure who actually made the quilt. They always thought it had been her mother Gertrude Ernesteen Todd but it could have been her mother, and they didn’t know who she was. While talking with them I learned they actually had no information on their family history and with a few facts I went home, deciding then and there I needed to learn a little more for them and for myself. Gertrude was born Oct 30 1913 in Tallahassee, Oklahoma. She married Elbert Jackson Poynor of Shawnee, Oklahoma.

When the dust bowl hit in 1930 the family made the move along with so many for California, first settling in Dent Township, San Joaquin, CA. As our conversation had continued it was possible the quilt came from Velma’s grandmother, a woman I discovered was named Melrose (Millie) Robertson, born 1883 in Carroll County, Ark. She married Joseph Edward Todd, born 1883 Leonard, Tulsa, OK.  They too, along with the family (all in OK) made the move to CA. All of the family would eventually move into Stanislaus County and surrounding country side. Melrose passed in 1937, Joseph went on to live another 30 plus years passing in 1963.

Whether it was Melrose’s hands that pieced this quilt or her daughter Gertrude, we will never know. But as I look into the years of wear I can picture it being tucked in doorways or window sill’s to stem the tide of sand blowing through the home. Or maybe they covered themselves in it as they ventured out to secure a cow or shut the barn door that may have blown open.

Velma’s father Elbert Jackson Poynor, Oklahoma born, was the son of Thomas Wilson Poynor of Fly, TN, He married Orlena Minnie Collins born in Arkansas. They married in 1904 in Hagar, Pottawtomie, OK. Perhaps Orlena had made the quilt.

I don’t think it really matters who made the quilt. The quilt itself is the living history of an event in our American history.

Velma’s family was the family of John Steinbeck’s novel “The Grapes Of Wrath” journeying on to the San Joaquin Valley and then on to Modesto.

If only they could have known that the wealth and warmth (we would feel) would be in the remnants of their hand crafted quilted beauties.

 

9 Square Lap Quilt Problem

This week I began working on the small 9 square lap quilt I am making for my neighbor Velma. It started with a multiple of pre hand quilted log cabin squares done by her mother. (still no date on when they were actually made)

logcabinsquares

The squares had been kept in chest laced with moth balls.

After many washings with vinegar and baking soda I felt confident the smell had been removed as well as the quilted squares holding up beautifully to the machine washings.

This week I began piecing the 9 chosen squares together and I have the 3 rows now in place ~ a good feeling

56

 

if it wasn’t for one small problem

Not all of the moth ball ‘fumes’ are actually gone, in fact they may be getting stronger. As I work, my eyes start burning and yes lips seem to be tingling as well. While the smell is not actually evident there seems to be residue lingering on the fabric.

57

It may be back to the washing for this beauty or full steam head – damn the torpedo’s and then the washing once all is in place.

Any one have any ideas that I could try ?

 

 

Hand Quilt Along ~ December

It is impossible that 3 weeks has passed since our last posting for the HQAL. December is in full swing, the lights of Hanukkah have been kindled, latkes made, and as I anxiously await Christmas and all its festivities, my quilt ‘Wishing You Good Will’ reminds me to truly be mindful of wishing you all good will, health and happiness all year through.

‘Wishing You Good Will’ is forever in the debt of this HQAL as it was what inspired me to pick her up and begin quilting her. I had found her at our local goodwill store – lonely, scared and tossed aside. I brought her home and tucked her away for a few more years until my discovery of this group.

I joined in January of 2018 after learning discovering it through Kerry at

https://lovethosehandsathome.wordpress.com

How I found Kerry’s blog, I simply can not remember but thankfully I did.

It was back in the 70’s that I began hand quilting, taught by 2 amazing woman from Oklahoma… mentors long passed but never forgotten. There was this enormous hand made quilting frame hanging from the ceiling taking up most of the living room. I had never seen anything like this before. Sister-in-law’s Alma Ayres and Wynotha Wall were busy hand quilting something. One look and I was hooked.

My first quilt was done in my own made up pattern, hand pieced in dotted swiss material. Alma donated the material to me. Still today, I think she must have given me the material on purpose. Oh goodness, if stitching through or around those dots didn’t deter me nothing would. I am sure it was a test to see if I could truly walk the talk. I can picture Wynotha and Alma secretly chuckling over giving me the swiss as my first project.

I have never used a machine, (although I did have my first 2 quilts professionally machine quilted, Alma must have felt sorry for me, thinking quilting them would be to big of a challenge) I still have no fancy tools, in fact I bought my first rotary cutter a week or so ago, I am back to scissors, I still cut out patterns from a heavy paper template I measure and make myself, I don’t know what BOM stands for, I had to look up what Fat Quarters were, WIP meant nothing to me, and stitching in ditch – what?

Hand Quilting has taken me from my 20’s into my 60’s now, an incredible journey that has taught me many life lessons, things like: patience, beauty is not always in perfection, organization, starting over doesn’t mean it was a mistake it means making it better, thinking things through before jumping in, don’t give up till you figure it out…I could go on but I know you get it.

When I look at Wishing You Good Will – this wedding ring beauty – its center four squares  represents my parents with me and my husband, its rings all the paths in my life branching off into their specific nucleus, my children, their families branching off on their life’s paths. Quilting is an amazing life journey.

4

Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas to all the amazing quilters/crafters I have met through this hand quilt along. Thank for an amazing year of encouragement, growth and education.

***********************************************************************************

This Hand Quilt Along is an opportunity for hand quilters and piecers to share and motivate one another. We post every three weeks, to show our progress and encourage one another.  If you have a hand quilting project and would like to join our group contact Kathy at the link below.

KathyLoriMargaretKerryEmmaTracyDebConnieSusan,  NanetteSassy , EdithSharonKarrin, and Gretchen